Alcohol Abuse

Brain Scans Predict Alcohol Problems in Young Adults

Brain Scans Predict Alcohol Problems in Young Adults

Posted on April 11th, 2014

People who regularly consume alcohol in large amounts significantly increase their chances of developing clinical symptoms of alcohol use disorder (the combined term for alcohol abuse and alcoholism). In a study published in April 2014 in the journal Addiction, researchers from five U.S. institutions used brain imaging to determine if it’s possible to predict which young adult drinkers have the highest chances of developing serious alcohol-related problems. These researchers concluded that certain observable changes in the brain’s responses to drinking cues do help identify future problem drinkers.

Read More

Binge-Drinking in Older Adults Doubles Risk of Death

Binge-Drinking in Older Adults Doubles Risk of Death

Posted on April 10th, 2014

According to nationwide surveys, around one in six American adults binge drinks four times per month. While most binge drinkers are not alcohol-dependent, the practice of binge drinking carries its own risks, and even though the lack of addiction may make these individuals feel as though their drinking is “safer,” this may not be the case. In fact, new research has shown that among “moderate” drinkers aged 55 to 65, binge drinking is associated with a doubling of the risk of death over the course of 20 years. The study shows the importance of understanding patterns of drinking and their consequences, rather than focusing on an average weekly consumption that can provide a misleading picture of the risks associated with alcohol.

Read More

Binge Drinking on the Rise in College

Binge Drinking on the Rise in College

Posted on April 8th, 2014

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) used self-reporting surveys to compare drinking behaviors between 1976 and today, finding that regular drinking habits seem largely unchanged over the past three decades, but binge drinking by coeds has seen a steep rise.

Read More

Alcohol Availability Influences Heavy Drinking

Alcohol Availability Influences Heavy Drinking

Posted on April 7th, 2014

Research on alcohol consumption has largely taken place in high-income countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom. In a less affluent country alcohol may be consumed for different reasons, in different quantities and purchased in different ways. A study that was initiated as a way to compare data from high- and middle/low-income countries found that heavy drinkers in the high-income country of New Zealand were adept at finding cheaper alcohol.

Read More

Despite Lower Levels of Drinking, African Americans Encounter More Harm

Despite Lower Levels of Drinking, African Americans Encounter More Harm

Posted on March 28th, 2014

Compared to Americans of European descent, African Americans as a whole drink less alcohol and engage less often in dangerous alcohol-related behaviors such as heavy drinking and binge drinking. Despite these facts, African Americans have an unusual tendency to develop serious problems stemming from alcohol consumption. In a report published in February 2014 by the American Psychological Association, researchers from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and three other U.S. universities explored some of the possible explanations for this discrepancy. The results of this exploration indicate that a mixture of factors account for the relatively high rate of alcohol-related harm in African Americans.

Read More

Binge Drinking Damages Brains of Young Adults

Binge Drinking Damages Brains of Young Adults

Posted on March 27th, 2014

Binge drinkers are people who consume enough alcohol in short drinking episodes (i.e., binges) to qualify as legally intoxicated. In the U.S., young adults participate in this type of alcohol consumption more often than people in any other age range. According to the results of a study scheduled for publication in 2014 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, young adults who binge drink (especially those who experience alcohol-related memory disruptions called “blackouts”) can develop damaging changes in their normal brain function that may set the stage for future diagnosable cases of alcohol abuse or alcoholism.

Read More

Do Hangovers Change Behaviors of Frequent Drinkers?

Do Hangovers Change Behaviors of Frequent Drinkers?

Posted on March 25th, 2014

Hangover is the common term for the group of unpleasant sensations that can appear in the aftermath of the consumption of significant amounts of alcohol. Current evidence suggests that susceptibility to these sensations may play an important role in any given person’s chances of developing diagnosable symptoms of alcohol-related problems. In a study scheduled for 2014 publication in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, researchers from three U.S. universities sought to determine if the presence of hangovers alters the drinking behaviors of people who consume alcohol on a frequent basis.

Read More

parents and kids drinking together

How Do Genes and Parental Rules Influence Teen Drinking?

Posted on March 6th, 2014

Teen drinking is a fairly common activity in the U.S., despite its illegality and harmful impact on adolescent health and well-being. In a significant number of cases, people who start drinking heavily during their teenage years continue to drink heavily during adulthood and develop medically serious alcohol-related problems. In a study published in 2013 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, a group of Dutch researchers investigated the role of two factors—genetic predisposition and parental rule-setting—in either increasing or decreasing any given teen’s likelihood of beginning a pattern of heavy alcohol consumption.

Read More

Drinking and Depression in Pregnant Women

Drinking and Depression in Pregnant Women

Posted on February 6th, 2014

While most expectant mothers in the U.S. are aware of the risks drinking and drug use pose for their unborn babies, drinking during pregnancy continues—and not always light drinking. What causes expectant mothers to consume alcohol and even binge drink during pregnancy? What motivates the behavior and what can be done to help women abstain from using and abusing alcohol during pregnancy?

Unfortunately the problem goes much deeper than the simple, unthinking craving for a drink or the desire for a little chemical relaxation. The issue? Depression, anxiety and other negative emotions, also referred to as “negative affectivity.”

Read More

Drinking Can Shrink Your Brain

Alcohol, Brain Function and Brain Damage

Posted on January 13th, 2014

Alcohol use disorder is the term doctors now use to diagnose the presence of clinical alcohol dependence (i.e., alcoholism), as well as medically serious alcohol abuse unrelated to alcohol dependence. Middle-aged and elderly people with longstanding versions of this disorder can develop significant brain damage in the form of brain shrinkage. In a study review published in 2013 in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism, researchers from Scotland’s University of Edinburgh sought to determine whether young adults and teenagers affected by alcohol use disorder also develop observable alcohol-related brain damage.

Read More

CDC: Doctors Fail to Discuss Alcohol With Patients

Think You Might Be Drinking Just a Little Too Much?

Posted on January 7th, 2014

CDC Urges Physicians to Ask About Alcohol

Doctors should do more to help their patients who drink heavily, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say.

Despite the fact that excessive alcohol use is blamed for an estimated 88,000 deaths and 2.5 million years of potential life lost each year in the United States, only one of six adults, including binge drinkers, reported ever discussing alcohol consumption with a health professional, according to a study released Jan. 7 by the CDC.

Read More

Surprising Number of Teens Drink Alone

Surprising Number of Teens Drink Alone

Posted on January 7th, 2014

Teenagers who drink alcohol commonly do so with their peers while participating in parties and other social rituals. In a study published in December 2013 in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh sought to determine how many teens drink alcohol alone rather than in social situations. In addition, since solitary drinking in adults is associated with higher alcohol intake and alcohol-related harm, the researchers assessed this practice’s ability to produce similar consequences in adolescents.

Read More

Teens Who Use Fake IDs on Slippery Slope to Alcoholism

Teens Who Use Fake IDs on Slippery Slope to Alcoholism

Posted on November 19th, 2013

False IDs, also known as fake IDs, are falsified identification documents designed to misrepresent a person’s age or other characteristics. Underage individuals sometimes use these IDs to circumvent minimum drinking-age laws. According to the results of a study published in October 2013 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, use of fake IDs by underage college students can help predict the eventual onset of alcohol use disorder, a condition that includes both alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence (alcoholism).

Read More

Transdiagnostic CBT Better Than Medication for Patients With Alcoholism, Anxiety

Transdiagnostic CBT Better Than Medication for Alcoholism, Anxiety

Posted on October 28th, 2013

Alcoholism is the well-known form of addiction that occurs when the brain develops a chemical reliance on the presence of alcohol. People affected by alcoholism also have unusually high risks for developing any one of several mental health conditions classified as anxiety disorders. In a study published in November 2013 in the journal Behaviour Research and Therapy, a multi-institution research team concluded that use of a form of psychotherapy called transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can potentially reduce the level of alcohol intake in alcoholics afflicted with medically serious anxiety.

Read More

Contact Promises Today for a Confidential Assessment.
Call 877-959-6078 or fill out the form below.

Your Name (required)

Your Email

Your Phone (required)

How did you hear about us?

Your Message