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genetics

man on couch with drink considering the connection between genetics and hangovers

Do Genetics Play a Role in Hangovers and Addiction?

“Hangover” is the widely used term for a collection of short-term side effects that can appear after a person consumes excessive amounts of alcohol. Previous research has shown that drinkers who frequently experience these side effects are more likely to eventually receive a diagnosis for alcohol use disorder (alcohol abuse/alcoholism) than drinkers who typically don’t …

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Is Depression Hereditary in Families?

From red-haired curls to dimpled cheeks, certain characteristics run in families. But not every inherited trait is as harmless as a dimpled cheek. Some families struggle with a darker legacy: depression. People who live with this mental illness aren’t just blue-they often feel hopeless, helpless, and, in the most serious cases, suicidal. The symptoms are …

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Family History of Bipolar Disorder May Make the Illness More Severe

Parents can pass along physical characteristics and even mannerisms to their offspring. Unfortunately, they can also pass along genes for illnesses like diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Researchers recently investigated how family history impacts bipolar disorder. Through the STEP-BP (Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder) study researchers found that a family history of mania …

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What Causes Depression in Women

Nearly everyone experiences times of feeling down. Sadness that lasts a day or two or even a few days is normal. But when it lasts for two weeks or more, it could be a sign of depression. Depression affects millions of Americans every year. However, though depression affects both women and men, it seems to …

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Common Genetic Variation Big Risk Factor for Alcoholism, Mental Illness

Researchers and addiction specialists are well aware that genetic factors play an important role in any given person’s chances of developing a physical dependence on alcohol (i.e., alcoholism). However, the factors involved are complex, and no one fully understands all of the specific genetic combinations that can increase your risk. In a study published in …

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How Does Family History Impact Risk for Drinking Problems?

All professionals who deal with alcohol-related issues know that a family history of diagnosable alcohol problems can significantly increase a person’s chances of developing his or her own pattern of problematic drinking. However, researchers are still exploring the ways in which such a history manifests in the present. In a study published in July 2014 …

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Is a Genetic Test for Alcoholism Too Good to Be True?

The authors of a study published in May 2014 in the journal Translational Psychiatry are optimistic that they have identified a number of gene variations that could be used to predict who is at greatest risk for alcoholism. The researchers, led by a team at the Indiana University School of Medicine, identified a group of …

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Which Genetic Factors Increase Susceptibility to Alcoholism?

Doctors and researchers know that some of the risks for developing alcoholism are passed on genetically from generation to generation. In a study published May/June 2014 in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism, researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina and the University of California, Los Angeles assessed the potential impact of two genetic variations …

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Are Specific Genes Responsible for Alcoholism?

Previous studies of twin siblings and families point to a strong genetic role in the development of an alcohol abuse problem. The trouble is finding out which among the 24,000 human genes are most responsible for the vulnerability.

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